How To Dehydrate Garlic — Plus Making Garlic Powder

We only recommend products and services we have thoroughly reviewed and used. This post may contain special affiliate links which allow us to earn a small commission if you make a purchase, however your price is NOT increased.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Dehydrating garlic is simple and completely straight forward. All you need to do is peel the garlic, chop it and then place it in the dehydrator. Let me show you how to dehydrate garlic step by step, give you a few tips and then show you how to make garlic powder, which is also super simple.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Start out with garlic that has aged a bit. Garlic is ripe when it starts to smell. If your garlic comes from your garden you will know when to harvest it because the top leaves will begin to turn brown. However, store bought garlic is a little different. I let the garlic sit out until it gives off a strong odor. Of course check it regularly because you do not want it to get moldy or start to sprout. Keep in mind that garlic will last a long time in a cool dry place, and just because it gives off a strong odor does not mean that it will rot immediately. I find that garlic that has been allowed to age a bit peels easier.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Separate the cloves from the bulb.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Take the skin off of each clove. Start by cutting off the root end of the clove.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

There are a couple of ways to easily remove the skin. One is to do as I mentioned above and age your garlic. If the skin still does not separate easily then you can microwave the cloves for about 8 seconds. If you choose not to use a microwave you can soak the cloves in cold water for about 10 to 15 minutes. Keep in mind that you want to remove the water content (dehydrate) from the garlic so this method will add water and add time to the dehydrating process. Check on the garlic frequently so that it is submerged the least amount of time possible.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Of course many hands make for light work……:)

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Wash the cloves.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

If you do not have a lot of garlic to dehydrate you could use a garlic press to chop your garlic.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

A garlic press makes really small pieces and a lot of garlic juice is lost. Even though you want to remove the water content from the garlic you do not want to remove the garlic juice, with all it’s  flavor and nutrients. When the moisture is removed during the dehydrating process the flavor and nutrients will stay behind.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

For chopping a lot of garlic I like this little hand cranked food processor. This is a gadget I got in a dirty Santa game; I would have donated it because of the “As Seen On TV” logo on the box (to me, “As Seen On TV” = junk), however, the prepper in me prevailed and I stashed it away in a closet, until one of my boys was curious about how it worked. To my surprise it does a great job with salsa and chopping things that the food possessor often pulverizes.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Here is a look at the inside. I will say that all the other parts are not very useful, but the parts you see above are worth the price alone. If I were going to buy one myself I would spend the few extra bucks to buy this one with the suction cups on the base.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Place the garlic in the processor.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Turn the handle.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

It chops the garlic to just the right size.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Load up your dehydrator trays.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

I started out with 5 lbs of garlic and filled eight trays in my nine tray Excalibur Dehydrator.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Set the temperature to 125ᵒF (the vegetable setting) and dehydrate for 8 to 12 hours.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

This is what the garlic looks like when it is dehydrated.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Here is a closer look. You can stop at this point and just store the garlic in a vacuum sealed jar (see below). This dehydrated chopped garlic would be great in soup or any dish that calls for chopped garlic. I saved some to use for this purpose but then I took the rest and made garlic powder.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

To make garlic powder you can use a food processor (the electric kind…..:). Maybe mine is just getting old but when I tried to make garlic powder I got a lot of powder blown into the air and the process was taking a very long time. I had this happen when making pumpkin flour too, so for this reason an electric food processor is not my first choice to grind the garlic.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

So I tested a few other methods. The pestle and mortar method worked really well.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

If you do not have a pestle and mortar I highly recommend adding one to your preps, it is an off grid solution for a lot of food preparation and it will last your entire life with proper maintenance.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Here’s a close up and you can see the fine powder produced with this method.  This would be a great job for your Wonder Junior Deluxe, if you have one (Read my review on the Wonder Junior Deluxe).

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

However, my favorite method is my little coffee grinder that I use exclusively to grind spices.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Load it up and press the button.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

You can see it does a great job.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Before I add the garlic powder to my food storage I vacuum pack it with my FoodSaver  in Mason jars with a jar sealer attachment.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

I love that the attachment works on these little 4oz jars.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

And the bigger jars; this is an 8oz jar. The attachment also works on quart size and pint jars.

how-to-dehydrate-garlic

Label and put away.

  • Hi Jennifer! Great tutorial! Love this! Thanks for sharing!

  • Jodi says:

    This is awesome! I totally need to try it. Will be sharing tomorrow 🙂

  • Todd Walker says:

    Love your DIY stuff, Jennifer! Sharing 🙂

  • Melody says:

    I just ran out of garlic powder so this article came just at the right time for me. I found an easier way to peel garlic. Take the whole head of garlic and give it a little smash so that the head is a little loosened up. You could mush it with the bottom of the pot or your hand. Don’t do anything else to it. Place it in a pot with a lid. Grabbing the pot and lid firmly, shake the heck out of it for about 10-15 seconds. Open up the pot and the cloves will be peeled. The pot I used was about a 2 quart size. It was amazing to see. I did have a couple of cloves that didn’t peel so I removed the peeled ones and shook the remaining ones and they were peeled.

  • Vicki says:

    Where did you set up your dehydrator for this task? I have been reading on several sites that when dehydrating onion and garlic don’t use it in the house because of the odor.

    • Jennifer says:

      Hi Vicki, believe it or not I did dehydrate the garlic inside. I do onions outside. You can read more on how I dehydrate onions here . I live in a two story house and I put the dehydrator on right before we all went upstairs for the night. It did smell like something was cooking for a few hours, but after that I didn’t smell a strong odor. I love the smell of garlic, so I did not find it bothersome. If you or your family do not like strong odors (although I didn’t think it was strong but you might) then you might want to move the dehydrator outside or to the garage depending on the weather.

  • Rebecca says:

    The Italian way. Break up the cloves. Lay each clove out and put the knife on it flat and smash it with your palm. Tigger palm in Kempo karate. The cloves then comes out of the skin easily. You can throw them in a food processor or chop them from there.

  • Rebecca says:

    I do these inside as well. Onions also. My husband thinks he’s getting a great Italian meal and then I disappoint him and tell him it’s garlic drying.

  • Candie Showalter says:

    OR U CAN GO TO SAM’S CLUB WHERE THEY HAVE BULK GARLIC ALREADY PEALED FOR CHEAP

    • Jennifer says:

      Hi Candie,
      Yes, you can go to Costco or Sams and get a large amount of peeled garlic for not too much money. However, a lot of people grow their own garlic, including me (although the garlic in this post was store bought). And even though you can get the peeled garlic at the big box stores it is still more expensive than the non-peeled. Then of course there is the fact that not everyone has access to those stores.

      • linda brodie says:

        And bought garlic doesn’t tadte as good and you have no idea what pesticides are used…and it’s SO easy to grow. I just wish I could stop my garlic powder from clumping…any ideas?

        • Jennifer Osuch says:

          Hi Linda,

          You can stick it back in the dehydrator. The reason it’s clumping is that it has moisture in it.

          • Diana Cavazos says:

            Depending on the container you are using to store/use the garlic powder, you can add an oyster cracker, or a small amount of rice to keep the powder dry.

        • Sandy says:

          I would wait to grind it into a powder. Leave the whole dried pieces And grind every month or so.

  • Kate says:

    Thanks for all the great info…I’m new to it all and am having so much fun learning! I want to get a vacuum sealer, but I simply can’t afford it right now. If I make garlic powder, how long is it stable on the shelf without vacuum sealing? Thanks 🙂

    I dehydrated onions yesterday and only have one non-stick sheet for my dehydrator trays…I tried parchment paper for two extra trays and it worked great! Ok to do that?

  • Kate says:

    oops, meant to ask…can I throw the garlic powder in a zip bag and in the freezer till needed? Thanks again 🙂

  • This is an awesome tutorial on how to do this. I have one of those excalibur dehydrators and I would love to give this a try.

  • Gabriela says:

    It says the time is from 8-12 hrs. How do i know exactly what time should I put on the dehydrator?? 🙂

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      Hi Gabriela, You have to check on the the garlic at about 8 hours. If it’s not done put it back in and check it every hour until it is done. It probably won’t take more than 12 hours unless you live in a very humid climate.

  • Rahja says:

    After drying the 5lbs what quantity would you say it comes out too? I’m going to load up my dehydrator tomorrow but want to know what it ratios out to so I do enough. Thanks

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      Hi Rahja,

      I’m sorry I didn’t measure. It’s such a bad habit of mine. I never measure anything. I did measure in my dehydrating celery post because someone asked me to. You can get an idea of how to measure the garlic by reading the celery post.

      • Rahja says:

        So 1lb of cloves came out to .37lb once dried. I’ve got 2 more pounds in now that I am going to weigh afterwards to see if they come out similar.

  • Carolyn says:

    My husband and I spent the whole day peeling garlic by hand. Then we found out that you just put the garlic cloves in a jar with a lid and shake for about 20-30 seconds. The jar works better than a pan with a lid because then you can shake with one hand. We didn’t put the whole bulb in the jar just the cloves. A plastic jar with lid works well also and is lighter to shake. Just don’t hit your face with it. LOL Also when I needed more solid mats for my dehydrator ( Excalibur ) I went to the dollar store and bought those plastic cutting mats. There are 2 in a pack for $1.00. Should work in any dehydrator, just trim to fit. Now I have lots of mats and saved a lot of money!!

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      Hi Carolyn,

      I have tried that garlic trick before and could not get it to work. I think it depends on how ripe or old your garlic is. The fresher garlic is more difficult to peel. As far as mats go just be super careful that they are food grade. I know that sounds crazy but kitchen supplies from our dollar store are questionable. Then also make sure they are non-stick and can withstand heat up to 150F. I’d hate for the mat to melt in your dehydrator and of course that would not be good for the food.

  • Cindy says:

    I’m really enjoying all your dehydration posts. I just received my new Excalibur dehydrator from Amazon and I’m looking forward to trying it out, so your instructional posts are gold to me. Thanks!

    I had a couple of suggestions for processing garlic. First, to peel, you can separate the cloves and then put them in a Mason jar or similar. Shake violently for a little while and most of the skins will come off. Second, to chop them in a food processor, it works best for me to drop the cloves in one at a time while the processor is running with the lower blade in place. They get chopped as they fall (it does quite a good job) and then they rest on the bottom and don’t get mushed up further unless you put a LOT of garlic in without emptying it out from time to time.

  • Debra says:

    Trying to up my dehydrating game by storing food with a food saver….that lovely gift that sat in the pantry for a year because it intimidated me. Your instructions for fruits say to freeze before vacuum sealing to pasteurize. Do I need to do the same for veggies? I sealed dehydrated onions today (in bags as I wait for Amazon to deliver my new mason jar attachments) without doing so and want to do garlic next. Also, should I use oxygen absorbers?

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      Hi Debra,

      You can put your vegetables in freezer too. It’s just an extra precaution especially if you dehydrated outside. If you use a vacuum sealer you don’t need oxygen absobers.

  • Justin says:

    My garlic has been sliced. I added it to the dehydrator and had a panic moment. “What temp do I use?”
    Jennifer-
    Your tutorial helped greatly. I think I may have found a new blog. Keep on keeping on!
    Cheers

  • Terrill D. Carpenter says:

    Just found your bog and hope it’s still active as Im looking forward to following along.

    I’m addicted to creating and using fruit and vegetable powders.

  • Natalie says:

    I do t have a vacuum dealer, do you know how long it is shelf stable without that step?

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      Hi Natalie,

      It depends on your climate and where you store your dehydrated food (i.e. out of sunlight, heat and moisture).

  • Teresa says:

    Hi Jennifer,

    Does the garlic smell stay with your dehydrator? I am worried about dehydrating with my Excalibur and then having the garlic smell in the dehydrator, making the rest of the items I dehydrate from then on have a garlic tinge smell.

    Thanks for your advice and the tutorial!!

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      No, it will dissipate. You can always dehydrate something like potatoes right after that will help absorb any remaining odor.

  • Nan says:

    Hi.
    I just wanted to warn you and others that when vacuum sealing powders you should put a coffee filter or part of a paper towel snugly on top of the powder before you put the lid on because I have ruined a machine by not doing this.
    Lessons learned.

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      Hi Nan,

      I’ve had the same thing happen to me. So yes, with very fine powder you’d want to have a barrier between the powder and the hose. I didn’t find it to be a problem with this garlic powder, but, of course, better safe than sorry.

  • Lita Watson says:

    Another thing we should take note about store bought garlic that avoid buying garlic in the refrigerator section of supermarket since these have been started getting moist and mold.

  • Keith says:

    My lids on my garlic powder will not say sealed. Thoughts or suggestions?

  • Virginia says:

    We grew enough garlic last year that it has lasted all winter and we still have a lot, yay! So I decided to try out dehydrating it and making garlic powder for the first time. I read through the tutorial and comments and went for it, inside my house… I got a horrible headache about an hour into the drying process and it just kept getting worse and worse… I felt like it had to be the overwhelming garlic smell, but have never experienced anything like this before (headache triggered by garlic) but I’ve also never dehydrated 8 trays of garlic in my house before either. I looked it up and found that the scent of garlic (and onions too) can most definitely cause headaches and even trigger migraines. I opened a window near the dehydrator to get some relief… And it definitely helped. Just wanted to put that out there in case it might help someone else avoid the headache.
    The dried garlic turned out great and I’m excited to use it, make spice blends, and share with friends and family……… next time I’m definitely doing it in my garage or outside… Ugh, my head hurts thinking about it!
    Thanks for the easy to follow directions and lovely photos!

  • Christina says:

    Can the dry garlic be put in a grinder like you use for peppercorns? Thanks

  • Amanda says:

    I appreciate you providing this info. I just poppped a few trays in my dehydrator!

  • Debbie says:

    Hi, can I dehydrate boughten garlic in the oven? I’ve got extra as I miscalculated on the amount needed for a recipe .

    • Jennifer Osuch says:

      Hi Debbie,
      You can use your oven if you can set it for under 200 degrees Fahrenheit. If it’s any higher than that you’re actually cooking the food not dehydrating it.

  • >
    Scroll to Top